Permaculture Design Course

Permaculture Design Course

Experience Permaculture course (PDC course) in Australia at Noosa Forest Retreat, a 160 acre holistic permaculture community & education centre in the United Nations accredited Biosphere of Noosa Hinterland, Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. Learn from a team of 6 experienced Cutting Edge permaculture teachers and specialist presenters, led by community teachers, Ian Trew (Bachelor Psychology & Health Science) &amp.

You will benefit from our collective community experience, inspiration & valuable knowledge. Individual attention after class and post course to offer you best Permaculture course & ongoing journey possible.

Specialist presenters on Urban Permaculture, Syntropic Farming, Governance & Community, Fungi, Mindfulness Training, Natural Movement, Food Preservation, Cell Grazing, Holistic Management & more.

Live on and enjoy a grass-roots developing Australian Permaculture community in the beautiful subtropical Noosa Hinterland, Sunshine Coast, Queensland.

Noosa Forest Retreat community and education center is a living example of a small group working together to develop sustainable, nutritious permaculture food systems in a shared natural environment.

Noosa Forest Retreat Community is being developed to nourish mind, body and soul while looking after the greater body of the earth. Learn to design and implement sustainable systems for yourself & others.

At the Permaculture Design Certificate Course you will gain valuable skills in complete holisitic habitat design, how to evaluate the soil, grow nutrient rich food, life changing bio-hacks to achieve peak health & vitality and much, much more.

Our residential Permaculture course will gently guide you through the life changing Permaculture journey, providing all the support and encouragement you need. You will obtain the overall knowledge, confidence and skills to offer a range of permaculture, farm & garden services and consultations.

You will also obtain permaculture design skills and professional network contacts to save thousands of dollars creating and implementing detailed healthy sustainable property designs for your self, family and friends.

You will be able to make an income offering permaculture design, implementation & maintenance services to others as a business.

If you are interested in integrated natural health, community development/living and personal development, then the Noosa Forest Retreat PDC is for you.

Inspiring, supporting and empowering you to help make the world a better healthier place for all beings!

1987: Lamellar barn or house construction

The Lost Stories are Bill Mollison’s articles published in the print magazine originally named Permaculture, then International Permaculture Journal and finally the Permaculture International Journal that was published between 1978 and 2000.
All stories and other content ©Permaculture Australia unless otherwise noted.

Story by Bill Mollison, 1987. Edition 27.
Feature photo: Bill Mollison with Russ Grayson at an Australasian permaculture convergence at Robyn Francis’ Djanbung Gardens at Nimbin, northern NSW, in 1997.
JOE LYNCH AND NETH MASS have studied and revived an interesting construction method of raising barns without any internal structure. Pioneered in the 1900’s by a German settler in Iowa, USA, lamellar barn rooves may be of any curve, including half circles.
The basic module from which this structure is built is a 1.50m x 20 x 31mm (60″x8″x1.25″) plank, cut at a constant angle to fit the next 3lank at either end. A slight taper 3n the outer ends allow an 200mm < 25mm (8″x1″) purlin to fit flat on all joins to take the roof materials.
The two end arches are built up and raised, forming the slope, and the laminae bolted up in basic diamond shapes, creating a curved roof. Careful pre-cutting and modelling helps. Eaves can 3e added by extending the purlins or end laminae can be fitted to curved end-walls.
The structure is immensely strong. Originals had only one 200mm x 19mm bolt at junctions, but now two 200mm x 6mm bolts are used.
The series of photos taken in August 1985 show Joe and Nath in the process of construction. The stages of construction largely self-explain the system but would-be builders should be very careful to do their planning and paperwork first and to constantly use stringlines on purlins to prevent developing a compound curve unless it is intended to tile the roof, when a full half-dome can be constructed.
Hopefully the photos tell all!
 

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