‘Fair Share’ Friday – two new Permafund projects

‘Fair Share’ Friday – two new Permafund projects

PA’s Permafund is thrilled to announce funding for another two grant projects thanks to funding from the Quaker Service Australia (QSA)

Firstly, introducing the Organic Food Kenya Project (OFK). The OFK believe in sustainable permaculture models that are integrated into a community’s culture and traditional methods of agriculture. Their motto “give people a fish, they eat for a day, but teach people to fish, and they eat forever”, aligns with their focus on providing education and support to reduce poverty and food insecurity.

“These are long term investments in the skills and assets of community members to be able to successfully participate in the course and gain lifelong knowledge. It is OFK’s firm belief that the best investments are in people and their success.”

The funding provided via PA’s Permafund will support community training in permaculture, positively impacting on 3000 community members, including women and children.

Our second new project will be implemented by the Rwanwanja Youth Innovation Group (RIYG) in Uganda.

Since permaculture came to the Rwanwanja refugee settlement, many people are impressed with it, especially youth because they are able to capture and adapt it. Parents are learning from their children and many backyard gardens have been created, though COVID-19 has had some impact

The funding provided via PA’s Permafund will assist RIYG to expand the permaculture activities already happening. This will include planting trees to protect the soil and provide food, composting, permaculture training, rain water collection &, establishing backyard gardens to support the monthly food ration.

More information:

PA’s Permafund provides small grants of less than $2000 AUD to community permaculture projects across the globe. Since 2012, we have funded 54 projects in 16 countries that support food security, seed sovereignty, regenerative farming practices and water harvesting thanks to your generous donations.

Donations over $2 in Australia are tax deductible and are a great way to enact the third permaculture ethic ‘fair share’. We have a further six projects on our waitlist we’d like to fund at the start of 2021, for more information including to donate click here.

‘Fair Share’ Friday – two new Permafund projects

Fair Share Friday – introducing three new Permafund projects

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We had such a great response to our ‘February Fair Share’ promotion, that PA’s Permafund has allocated funding to an additional three projects. Thanks to your generous support, we’ve now supported a total 58 projects in 16 countries!

Our first new project is in Tanzania – funding practical permaculture for youth and women, and implemented by SuBeHuDe. This project will include permaculture training for 100 community members, supporting green jobs and employability to break the cycle of poverty.

Our second new project in the Philippines, supports the Seed4Com 7HUrban Permaculture project. This project will convert a property into an urban farm using permaculture principles & regenerative farming, with the aim of improving food security for the Indigenous community.

And last but not least – we will also be funding the 1000 tree project supported by Swayyam in Southern India. This is a rural initiative which will support small groups of marginal farmers to acquire fencing, water harvesting earthworks, drought tolerant native crop seeds and high quality tree saplings.

Why donate to Permafund?

“At Pip Media we follow the permaculture ethics of earth care, people care and fair share – by donating to Permafund we share some of the profits that come through the work we do… We know the donation will go to projects that have been carefully selected by the great team behind PA’s Permafund – Permaculture International Public Fund whom share similar values to Pip,” Robyn Rosenfelt, Editor Pip Magazine

Our farmers knowledge is increasing in permaculture systems, they are becoming resilient and are able to grow their own local food that benefits many families and more! When farmers are able to grow & eat their own local food it is the best way of giving power to our communities in ways that are truly regenerative, and improves the quality of life and biodiversity on Earth, for our children to inherit”, Grant recipient, Kenya

This is what PA’s Permafund is all about – enacting the the three ethics of permaculture (Earth Care, People Care & Fair Share) and supporting grassroots projects around the globe to build stronger communities.

How can I get involved?

Want to make a difference too? Donate to PA’s Permafund today and help build food security and stronger communities across the globe. Donations over $2 in Australia are tax deductible and are a great way to enact the third permaculture ethic ‘fair share’. For more information including to donate please click here.

Permafund supports permaculture workshops in India

Permafund supports permaculture workshops in India

In 2018 the Integrated Rural Development Society (IRDS) of the Salem District, Tamil Nadu successfully applied for a Permfund micro grant to conduct training workshops for 50 tribal farmers from the Mannur, Alamarathukadu, and Poomarathupatti villages in the Kalrayan Hills.

Farmers with an interest in permaculture and new agriculture methods were identified with the help of farmer leaders before being introduced to the project’s goals and main activities.

Seed varieties shared during workshop

A series of workshops were conducted covering permaculture and organic agriculture methods to maximise return from the same land in multiple ways, the control of weeds by intercropping, making liquid fertiliser to increase micro-organisms in the soil and water harvesting to improve soil moisture.

Liquid fertiliser demonstration

Seeds and seedlings were distributed to increase the diversity of vegetable and indigenous grain crops being cultivated. The project has helped the farmers lessen their reliance on outside inputs and improve their harvests for better food security.

Intercropping increasing yields

On behalf of the tribal farmers, the IRDS team has expressed their sincere thanks to Permaculture Australia and Permafund for the partnership, cooperation and support that’s enabled the organisation to implement this important project in their community.

The activities of the Integrated Rural Development Society include raising awareness of the importance of protective, preventive health practices including providing clean drinking water and good sanitation.  Other major issues addressed by the organisation are the empowerment of women, environmental protection, HIV and AIDS awareness and health development through alternate medical practices such as naturopathy and yoga practices.

Tax deductible donations to Permafund support permaculture-oriented projects like this in Australia and overseas.

For more information please contact permafund@permacultureaustralia.org.au.

A variety of crops fill the fields

Permafund micro-grant supports seed bank in India

Permafund micro-grant supports seed bank in India

In the 2018-19 grant round, Permafund supported the Women’s Organisation for Rural Development (WORD) in India with a micro-grant for their project to help marginal farmers cultivate grains and indigenous millets and create a seed bank for future crops.

Based in the Indian Namakkal District of Tamil Nadu, the project reached 225 farmers in targeted villages where rain-fed agriculture is predominant. In the growing season 150 farmers were provided with sorghum and millet to cultivate on their land and 75 farmers sowed maize. All of the harvests improved food security for the villages.

Harvested seeds saved for the next crop

The farmers’ harvest returned double the quantity of grains and millet seeds to WORD’s seed bank ready for the July 2020 to February 2021 growing season.

The Women’s Organisation for Rural Development has expressed their sincere thanks to Permaculture Australia’s Permafund for their support and partnership with WORD and the farmers in their area.

WORD officially formed in 1991 based on an 80’s movement of young women inspired by the spirit of the Gandhian Boodan Movement of the 60’s. That movement had attempted to persuade wealthy landowners to voluntarily give a percentage of their land to landless people.

Among the motivations for WORD has been the appalling plight of the Dalits, who are among the most marginalised and deprived populations.  Another challenge is the rising degradation and depletion of the natural resources which marginal villages rely on for their livelihoods.

One off and recurring donations to Permafund are assisting community-oriented organisations like this in Australia and around the world.

For more information please contact the Permafund team at  permafund@permacultureaustralia.org.au

 

Combating malnutrition in Kakuma Refugee Camp Kenya

Combating malnutrition in Kakuma Refugee Camp Kenya

In the 2018-19 Permafund micro-grant round an application by Faulu Productions to establish a permaculture food production system in the Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya was supported with AU$2,000 to help combat malnutrition in the camp.

Faulu Productions is an organisation that consists of refugees, volunteers and supporters from all around the world. Their mission is to promote agriculture and education, to help create a safe, sustainable living for refugees and to empower them to improve their lifestyles.

The project has established a multi-site permaculture system with 200 participants establishing 5 by 10 metre garden plots in their own compounds and contributing to the maintenance of the larger Kakuma community garden and central Turkana permaculture community gardens.

Preparing garden beds for seeds

The gardens are modeled on natural ecosystems combining ecological, engineering and environmental principles. The designs have used integrated natural water resource management systems and sustainable architecture, so the project is self-maintaining, regenerative and an ongoing source of fresh produce and biomass.

Newly planted beds and maturing crops

The objective has been to help the refugees to become self-sufficient. The key component of the plan was water conservation with an investment in water storage (40 water tanks to harvest 2,000 litres). Digging tools and bulk seeds were purchased and watering cans to help prevent splash erosion and the destruction of young seedlings.

Preparing the harvest for sharing

The participating workers have been resourceful collecting mulch materials and manures and contributing earth building skills.

Making mud bricks for house construction

Trees were planted in the gardens for shade, erosion protection and to provide chop and drop material to assist with mulching & soil creation.

With no “qualified” experts inside the camp the participants are using YouTube to learn the practical skills of permaculture, including watching videos by Australian experts including Geoff Lawton and Morag Gamble.

This project is viewed on the ground as 100% sustainable because it has created job opportunities among refugees, improved the quality of the camp’s environment and helped improve community health and well being. More permaculture inspired enterprises and initiatives are being undertaken following this ground-breaking project.

The community appreciates all donations.

The Kakuma Refugee Camp suffers from regular, severe flooding, the most recent being in early February 2020. Houses have been destroyed and belongings and food washed away.

Flood damage to buildings

Continuing permaculture projects not only supply food and hope but also prevent erosion and washaways as trees and plants take root.

Newly planted gardens and maturing crops

Your generous donations to Permafund support this and other permaculture related projects in Australia and overseas and are very much appreciated.

For more information contact the Permafund team at permafund@permacultureaustralia.org.au

 

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